Tag Archives: typography

Josef Müller-Brockmann: Pioneer of Swiss graphic design.

All of my designer readers most likely carry on a rather intimate relationship with Josef Müller-Brockmann. But, for those of you who aren’t so lucky, allow me to make the necessary introductions. Born in Rapperswil, Switzerland in 1914, Müller-Brockmann would later go on to become known as the Pioneer of Swiss Graphic Design. As explained in Eye Magazine:

By the 1950s [Müller-Brockmann] was established as the leading practitioner and theorist of the Swiss Style, which sought a universal graphic expression through a grid-based design purged of extraneous illustration and subjective feeling.

JM-B did an interview with Eye Magazine for their Winter 1995 issue,  just one year prior to his passing. In the interview, the innovative Swiss designer was asked what order meant to him:

Order was always wishful thinking for me. For 60 years I have produced disorder in files, correspondence and books. In my work, however, I have always aspired to a distinct arrangement of typographic and pictorial elements, the clear identification of priorities. The formal organisation of the surface by means of the grid, a knowledge of the rules that govern legibility (line length, word and letter spacing and so on) and the meaningful use of colour are among the tools a designer must master in order to complete his or her task in a rational and economic manner.

The grid, the prioritization and arrangement of typographic and pictorial elements, the meaningful use of color… Observe the Swiss mastery below:

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The book cover designs of Isaac Tobin

Just stumbled upon the blog of The Casual Optimist and caught an interview that he conducted with Isaac Tobin, senior designer with the University of Chicago Press. The images are fabulous, so I wanted to share some of my favorites with you here. I want to run my fingers all over that Obsession cover.

More of Tobin’s designs and the full interview at The Casual Optimist HERE.

Follow The Casual Optimist/Dan Wagstaff on Twitter HERE.

Shuffle

Check out these wonderfully designed vintage playing cards, which I just discovered over at Delicious Industries’ Flickr page:

Visit Delicious Industries’ blog HERE and follow them on Twitter HERE.

Westvaco II

Images from Westvaco manual #II: Inspirations for Printers (1953-1955) :

There are so many more brilliant images over at Design & Typo, le Blog. I’m tempted to post them all, but instead I’ll direct you to them HERE. And don’t forget to check out the first manual, which I posted about HERE.


Lite-Brite Type from GrandArmy

O ne of my new Twitter followers, @caseandpointtype, posted a Tumblr image called “Lite-Brite Type.” How does one resist anything related to Lite-Brite, that’s my question? Right. One does NOT resist such things. Rather, one clicks ferociously to the source. Which brought one/me to these gorgeously vibrant images over at Type Theory: Lite-Brite Type created by GrandArmy:

Kinda makes you wanna bust out your Lite-Brite and go to town, right? Yeah, me too.

New Vintage Type

A s usual, I’m a little slow. Thus, my recent discovery (“recent” as in “5 minutes ago”) of New Vintage Type, a mouthwatering collection of type designs that sort of make me foam at the mouth. In a good way. The book, compiled and edited by designer greats Steven Heller and Gail Anderson, apparently came out in 2007. Like I said, I’m slow. But, just in case you’d forgotten about it, or in case you’d never heard of it, here you go. Personally, I’m a little bummed I didn’t “recently discover” this in time to chuck it onto my Christmas list. Do people give New Year’s gifts?

All images below graciously borrowed from Print & Pattern, but you can purchase New Vintage Type HERE.

Enamo(RED)

V intage and modern typography designs that glorify the color red blanket me in holiday warmth. All drool-inducing images below have been graciously borrowed from the always fabulous WeLoveTypography.com, where you can search typographic images by color. Which is how I found these little gems.

(The Ohioan in me couldn’t resist this one)