Tag Archives: 1920s

The Cornell Widow

was just gazing at some of the tons of brilliantly beautiful ephemera images over at Ephemera Assemblyman, and I thought I’d post some covers of a Cornellian student-run magazine called The Widow. It enjoyed over six decades of publication (1894-1962) until it was forced to go out of print because of yucky financial problems (ain’t that always the case?). As the Ephemera Assemblyman quotes on his site, The Widow’s name derives from “the college widow,” which was the name co-eds used to ascribe to “the girl who bowled over class after class of freshmen without really landing one.” Lovely. As you might imagine, the contents and images of the magazine could occasionally trend toward the misogynistic. But oh how the designs were lovely. Take a peek…

(All images below courtesy of the Ephemera Assemblyman)

That last cover was for an issue that appeared in 1981 (yes, 19 years after The Widow had actually folded) and was meant to mock the 100-year anthology of The Widow‘s rival, The Cornell Daily Sun).

For more covers as well as some interior content, head over to the Ephemera Assemblyman HERE.

(Initial “I” from HERE)

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Vintage Japanese New Years postcards

t kills me that I live in Boston and haven’t been to the Museum of Fine Arts in, let’s see… three years, I think? Ridiculous. We have a new Institute of Contemporary Art as well, but I haven’t been there either. WTF? You’d think I have a dissertation and teaching and tutoring and Etsy and design blog stalking to do or something!

Anyway, so I was just checking out the MFA online, doing a virtual visit (since I’m pretty sure the physical building is closed at 10:59pm), and I came across their fabulous collection of New Year’s Japanese Postcards, some of which I absolutely must share with you:

New Year’s Card: Dog on a Blackboard Offers Congratulations
年賀状:黒板の犬
Japanese, Late Meiji era, 1910
Artist Unidentified, Japanese

New Year’s Card
年賀状;のむらや
Japanese, Showa era, 1930
Artist Unknown, Japanese
Publisher: Nomuraya

New Year’s Card: Goat in a Heart
年賀状:山羊
Japanese, Late Meiji era, 1907
Maruyama Banka, Japanese, 1867–1942

New Year’s Card: Penguins
年賀状:ペンギン
Japanese, Taishô era, 1921
Sugiura Hisui, Japanese, 1876–1965

New Year’s Card: Bull and a Woman
年賀状:牛
Japanese, Taisho era, 1925
Artist Unknown, Japanese

New Year’s Card: Going to Shimonoseki
Original Title: Shimonoseki yuki
年賀状:下関へ
Japanese, Taishô-early Shôwa era
S. Riyo, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Tanaka & Co.

New Year’s Card: Goat
年賀状:羊-1931
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1931
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card with Airplane
年賀状:空中旋回
Japanese, Taisho- early Showa era
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card: The Monkey Celebrating with Ozoni (from an unidentified series) of New Year’s cards
Original Title: Ozoni iwau osaru
「おぞうに祝ふ猿」
Japanese, Showa era, 1932
Artist Unidentified, Japanese
Publisher: Tanaka & Co.

New Year’s Card: Dragon
年賀状:龍
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1928
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Yamaguchi Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card: Mouse at the Piano
年賀状:ねずみのピアノ
Japanese, Taisho era, 1912
Artist Unknown, Japanese
Publisher: Naniwaya
Printed by: Tokyo Design Printing Company (Tokyo zuan insatsu sha)

New Year’s Card: Seahorses
年賀状:龍の落とし子
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1928
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Yamaguchi Seikyokudô

{ All images above borrowed from the MFA’s online New Year’s Japanese Postcard collection,
which you should visit HERE. }

Aren’t they great? Yeah, I thought so, too. Japan’s pretty awesome.

I really need to get back to that museum.


(Initial “I” found HERE)

Blanco y Negro

Lovely cover images from the Spanish magazine Blanco y Negro, published in the 1920s and 30s. Found courtesy of the beautiful Art Deco blog.

ABC Magazine: Revista Portugueza

Images from some 1920s issues of ABC Magazine discovered over at the fabulous Dias que Voam blog:

An adorably illustrated ad from one of the issues:

Blickfang: German book covers

The other day, I was fortunate enough to have a FABULOUS new Twitter friend retweet the link to my post on Carl Jung’s Red Book . This new Twitter friend, @roundmyskull, just so happens to have an amazingly overstimulating blog devoted to the treasures of “forgotten literature.” There, I discovered that, in German, “blickfang” means “eye-catcher,” and it is part of the title of a fabulous collection of thousands of book cover designs from Weimar Berlin, from 1919-1933. (Click HERE for a link to the book)

All images below have been graciously borrowed from the highly seductive blog, A Journey Round My Skull. I majorly encourage you to visit the blog… and the STELLAR Flickr stream. You’ll spend HOURS…

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The poster designs of Sven Brasch

Sven Brasch (1886-1970) is undoubtedly the most highly revered Danish poster designer. From his movie posters to his commercial designs, here’s why:

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All images borrowed from Confetta’s Sven Brasch Flickr set. Click over to see more than 60 other Brasch goodies!

Throwback Thursday: 1920s Illustrations of John Held, Jr.

Few artists define an age as thoroughly as John Held, Jr., defines the “Roaring Twenties.” Born in 1889, he was the right age at the right time with an outlook and sense of humor that shaped as well as recorded a generation. (Source)

Held’s talents bloomed early. In fact, he sold his first illustration to highly reputable Life Magazine at the tender age of 15. What ultimately followed was an illustrious career depicting the flappers and the jazz age of the 1920s (and, occasionally, some cringeworthy commentaries on women).

For additional biographical information on John Held, Jr., click here.

The following images are all borrowed either from Art Deco’s fabulous blog, or from this Flickr set devoted to Held’s works…

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