Tag Archives: art

The Taxali 300

Why don’t I live in Toronto? Or, at least, only an hour away or something? Because in Toronto there’s a place called Narwhal Art Projects. And at Narwhal Art Projects there’s an exhibition called The Taxali 300. And the Taxali 300 runs for a month, from January 28 – February 28, and it features hundreds (umm, 300?) of Taxali’s amazing illustrations and collages, together in a collection for the first time. From Narwhal’s website:

The Taxali 300 showcases hundreds of small illustrations and collages originally created for such esteemed publica- tions as Rolling Stone, Newsweek, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeneys among others. Spanning two decades and multiple awards and accolades, The Taxali 300 presents Gary’s exceptional collection of commercial illustration as a complete body of work in a gallery setting for the first time, allowing viewers to appreciate the prolific scope of visual communications and tactile character design intrinsically associated with Gary Taxali’s artwork.

It was painfully difficult to select only a handful to share with you here, so I really hope you’ll go to Narwhal’s gallery and look through them all yourselves. But here are some of my favorites. Emphasis on “some” – I have about a bajillion.


OK, I need to stop. I could post them all. Seriously.

Hope you like.

Lehel Kovács’s Google Street View series

Lehel Kovács is a Hungary-based freelance illustrator, and his recent Google Street View series of sketches is deservedly catching lots of internet attention lately. Some of my favorites appear below, but I strongly encourage you all to visit his website, Flickr stream, and blog for more (and I am so grateful for just how much more there is!):

Westvaco II

Images from Westvaco manual #II: Inspirations for Printers (1953-1955) :

There are so many more brilliant images over at Design & Typo, le Blog. I’m tempted to post them all, but instead I’ll direct you to them HERE. And don’t forget to check out the first manual, which I posted about HERE.


Westvaco I

I was scoping out WeLoveTypography the other day (as I often do), and I came across a beautiful typographical image that linked over to Design & Typo, le Blog. There, I discovered the mother-load: tons more of similarly amazing designs from two separate Westvaco manuals.

Images from Westvaco Promotion Guide #1 (1956-1961):

I will post images from the second manual in a new post. Stay tuned!

Maurizio Pellegrin

Holy crap.

You’ll see what I mean:

See? You’re drooling, aren’t you?

So much more (and in amazing color collections) at Maurizio’s site HERE.

Vintage Japanese New Years postcards

t kills me that I live in Boston and haven’t been to the Museum of Fine Arts in, let’s see… three years, I think? Ridiculous. We have a new Institute of Contemporary Art as well, but I haven’t been there either. WTF? You’d think I have a dissertation and teaching and tutoring and Etsy and design blog stalking to do or something!

Anyway, so I was just checking out the MFA online, doing a virtual visit (since I’m pretty sure the physical building is closed at 10:59pm), and I came across their fabulous collection of New Year’s Japanese Postcards, some of which I absolutely must share with you:

New Year’s Card: Dog on a Blackboard Offers Congratulations
年賀状:黒板の犬
Japanese, Late Meiji era, 1910
Artist Unidentified, Japanese

New Year’s Card
年賀状;のむらや
Japanese, Showa era, 1930
Artist Unknown, Japanese
Publisher: Nomuraya

New Year’s Card: Goat in a Heart
年賀状:山羊
Japanese, Late Meiji era, 1907
Maruyama Banka, Japanese, 1867–1942

New Year’s Card: Penguins
年賀状:ペンギン
Japanese, Taishô era, 1921
Sugiura Hisui, Japanese, 1876–1965

New Year’s Card: Bull and a Woman
年賀状:牛
Japanese, Taisho era, 1925
Artist Unknown, Japanese

New Year’s Card: Going to Shimonoseki
Original Title: Shimonoseki yuki
年賀状:下関へ
Japanese, Taishô-early Shôwa era
S. Riyo, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Tanaka & Co.

New Year’s Card: Goat
年賀状:羊-1931
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1931
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card with Airplane
年賀状:空中旋回
Japanese, Taisho- early Showa era
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card: The Monkey Celebrating with Ozoni (from an unidentified series) of New Year’s cards
Original Title: Ozoni iwau osaru
「おぞうに祝ふ猿」
Japanese, Showa era, 1932
Artist Unidentified, Japanese
Publisher: Tanaka & Co.

New Year’s Card: Dragon
年賀状:龍
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1928
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Yamaguchi Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card: Mouse at the Piano
年賀状:ねずみのピアノ
Japanese, Taisho era, 1912
Artist Unknown, Japanese
Publisher: Naniwaya
Printed by: Tokyo Design Printing Company (Tokyo zuan insatsu sha)

New Year’s Card: Seahorses
年賀状:龍の落とし子
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1928
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Yamaguchi Seikyokudô

{ All images above borrowed from the MFA’s online New Year’s Japanese Postcard collection,
which you should visit HERE. }

Aren’t they great? Yeah, I thought so, too. Japan’s pretty awesome.

I really need to get back to that museum.


(Initial “I” found HERE)

Iranian children’s books from the 1970s

Unbelievably beautiful children’s books were produced in Iran in the 1970s. I just wish that I could read them.

The images below are courtesy of A Journey Round My Skull’s “Iran” collection, which I strongly encourage you to visit. Such great use of color, brilliant illustrations, and gorgeous calligraphy… I’m kind of drooling right now. In fact, I should probably go fetch a hankie.

OK. All better. Anyway, please enjoy, and please also take a moment to visit the International Children’s Digital Library HERE.

All images below kindly borrowed from A Journey Round My Skull, a stellar blog of under-appreciated (old) books that you should visit at any and all times.

The birdies might be my favorite, despite the lack of calligraphy/text.

Follow A Journey Round My Skull on Twitter HERE and visit the blog HERE.