Tag Archives: children

Faber & Faber book cover designs

Lovely book cover designs from Faber Books’ Photostream:

Don’t mess with Smokey

I’m a big anti-forest fire fan. It’s a good thing to be. Plus,  I wouldn’t want to p*ss off Smokey or anything. That guy means business.

The following fetching images are all borrowed from Grickily’s “Cool Old Stuff” Flickr set, which you should really check out, because it’s AWESOME.

I didn’t realize Smokey prayed, but hey, whatever prevents forest fires. Go for it.

Vintage Japanese New Years postcards

t kills me that I live in Boston and haven’t been to the Museum of Fine Arts in, let’s see… three years, I think? Ridiculous. We have a new Institute of Contemporary Art as well, but I haven’t been there either. WTF? You’d think I have a dissertation and teaching and tutoring and Etsy and design blog stalking to do or something!

Anyway, so I was just checking out the MFA online, doing a virtual visit (since I’m pretty sure the physical building is closed at 10:59pm), and I came across their fabulous collection of New Year’s Japanese Postcards, some of which I absolutely must share with you:

New Year’s Card: Dog on a Blackboard Offers Congratulations
年賀状:黒板の犬
Japanese, Late Meiji era, 1910
Artist Unidentified, Japanese

New Year’s Card
年賀状;のむらや
Japanese, Showa era, 1930
Artist Unknown, Japanese
Publisher: Nomuraya

New Year’s Card: Goat in a Heart
年賀状:山羊
Japanese, Late Meiji era, 1907
Maruyama Banka, Japanese, 1867–1942

New Year’s Card: Penguins
年賀状:ペンギン
Japanese, Taishô era, 1921
Sugiura Hisui, Japanese, 1876–1965

New Year’s Card: Bull and a Woman
年賀状:牛
Japanese, Taisho era, 1925
Artist Unknown, Japanese

New Year’s Card: Going to Shimonoseki
Original Title: Shimonoseki yuki
年賀状:下関へ
Japanese, Taishô-early Shôwa era
S. Riyo, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Tanaka & Co.

New Year’s Card: Goat
年賀状:羊-1931
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1931
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card with Airplane
年賀状:空中旋回
Japanese, Taisho- early Showa era
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card: The Monkey Celebrating with Ozoni (from an unidentified series) of New Year’s cards
Original Title: Ozoni iwau osaru
「おぞうに祝ふ猿」
Japanese, Showa era, 1932
Artist Unidentified, Japanese
Publisher: Tanaka & Co.

New Year’s Card: Dragon
年賀状:龍
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1928
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Yamaguchi Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card: Mouse at the Piano
年賀状:ねずみのピアノ
Japanese, Taisho era, 1912
Artist Unknown, Japanese
Publisher: Naniwaya
Printed by: Tokyo Design Printing Company (Tokyo zuan insatsu sha)

New Year’s Card: Seahorses
年賀状:龍の落とし子
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1928
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Yamaguchi Seikyokudô

{ All images above borrowed from the MFA’s online New Year’s Japanese Postcard collection,
which you should visit HERE. }

Aren’t they great? Yeah, I thought so, too. Japan’s pretty awesome.

I really need to get back to that museum.


(Initial “I” found HERE)

Iranian children’s books from the 1970s

Unbelievably beautiful children’s books were produced in Iran in the 1970s. I just wish that I could read them.

The images below are courtesy of A Journey Round My Skull’s “Iran” collection, which I strongly encourage you to visit. Such great use of color, brilliant illustrations, and gorgeous calligraphy… I’m kind of drooling right now. In fact, I should probably go fetch a hankie.

OK. All better. Anyway, please enjoy, and please also take a moment to visit the International Children’s Digital Library HERE.

All images below kindly borrowed from A Journey Round My Skull, a stellar blog of under-appreciated (old) books that you should visit at any and all times.

The birdies might be my favorite, despite the lack of calligraphy/text.

Follow A Journey Round My Skull on Twitter HERE and visit the blog HERE.

Grammar Can Be Fun

Grammar Can Be Fun was written by Munro Leaf and published in 1934. Clearly, it rules. You can pretty much always assume I’ll dig something that instills good grammar, especially if that something explains the difference between “well” and “good.” And especially if those explanations are accompanied by awesome illustrations. All images below found over at Curious Pages (amazing blog of lesser-known children’s books, which you must visit A.S.A.P.!) by way of Martin Klasch:

Lite-Brite Type from GrandArmy

O ne of my new Twitter followers, @caseandpointtype, posted a Tumblr image called “Lite-Brite Type.” How does one resist anything related to Lite-Brite, that’s my question? Right. One does NOT resist such things. Rather, one clicks ferociously to the source. Which brought one/me to these gorgeously vibrant images over at Type Theory: Lite-Brite Type created by GrandArmy:

Kinda makes you wanna bust out your Lite-Brite and go to town, right? Yeah, me too.

French Friday: Capucine for Edurelief

One of my former French students sent me this Capucine video via Facebook the other day (merci PN!), and I can’t stop hearing Capucine’s cute, animated little narrative voice talking about “les popotames” (hippopotamuseseses).

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Once upon a time… on Vimeo“, posted with vodpod

Quelle imagination de cette petite fille qui rêve des monstres et de la pauvreté et de l’égalité pour tous!

After I received the video, I did a little Googling and found that la petite Capucine has inspired a charitable endeavour by her mother, who is now raising funds for Edurelief, which is a non-profit that raises money to help kids in Mongolia who lack books and other educational necessities. Donations can be made directly to Edurelief, or you can purchase a ridiculously cute t-shirt that features one of Capucine’s original drawings and a quote from one of her adorable tales (quotes can be printed in French or in English). Some images from the website, which you should visit tout de suite:


To learn more about la mignonne Capucine and to watch all of her storytelling videos, click over to the Capucha website HERE.

Some of my favorite Capucine photos from the website (I am having MAJOR difficulty dealing with how cute she is. I bet you will, too. Oh, and I also bet you’ll want that Nutella like I do, too.):