Tag Archives: fashion

Vintage smoking ads from lamarde

Aqua-Velvet recently tweeted about lamarde, thus introducing me to the fabulous world of vintage cigarette advertising and packaging. There’s a reason we have so many unfortunate people addicted to nicotine: the advertising was glamourous, beautiful, and downright awesome in terms of design execution. Despite my devotion to all things design-related (which, yes, includes my appreciation for pro-smoking ads), I still feel compelled to state that I abhor cigarettes and their disastrously horrific effects on the body (and on innocent bystanders’ bodies). I have a step-father who is currently battling stage IV lung cancer. Meanwhile, my mother won’t stop lighting up, despite the smoking-induced tragedy barely breathing next to her. I am, in other words, not a fan of smoking.

But I am a fan of great design. And of lamarde’s beautiful gallery of advertisements, which is where I found all of the images posted below. Enjoy. These are some of my favorites:

Visit lamarde’s blog HERE. Follow lamarde on Twitter HERE.

Vintage Japanese New Years postcards

t kills me that I live in Boston and haven’t been to the Museum of Fine Arts in, let’s see… three years, I think? Ridiculous. We have a new Institute of Contemporary Art as well, but I haven’t been there either. WTF? You’d think I have a dissertation and teaching and tutoring and Etsy and design blog stalking to do or something!

Anyway, so I was just checking out the MFA online, doing a virtual visit (since I’m pretty sure the physical building is closed at 10:59pm), and I came across their fabulous collection of New Year’s Japanese Postcards, some of which I absolutely must share with you:

New Year’s Card: Dog on a Blackboard Offers Congratulations
年賀状:黒板の犬
Japanese, Late Meiji era, 1910
Artist Unidentified, Japanese

New Year’s Card
年賀状;のむらや
Japanese, Showa era, 1930
Artist Unknown, Japanese
Publisher: Nomuraya

New Year’s Card: Goat in a Heart
年賀状:山羊
Japanese, Late Meiji era, 1907
Maruyama Banka, Japanese, 1867–1942

New Year’s Card: Penguins
年賀状:ペンギン
Japanese, Taishô era, 1921
Sugiura Hisui, Japanese, 1876–1965

New Year’s Card: Bull and a Woman
年賀状:牛
Japanese, Taisho era, 1925
Artist Unknown, Japanese

New Year’s Card: Going to Shimonoseki
Original Title: Shimonoseki yuki
年賀状:下関へ
Japanese, Taishô-early Shôwa era
S. Riyo, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Tanaka & Co.

New Year’s Card: Goat
年賀状:羊-1931
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1931
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card with Airplane
年賀状:空中旋回
Japanese, Taisho- early Showa era
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card: The Monkey Celebrating with Ozoni (from an unidentified series) of New Year’s cards
Original Title: Ozoni iwau osaru
「おぞうに祝ふ猿」
Japanese, Showa era, 1932
Artist Unidentified, Japanese
Publisher: Tanaka & Co.

New Year’s Card: Dragon
年賀状:龍
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1928
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Yamaguchi Seikyokudô

New Year’s Card: Mouse at the Piano
年賀状:ねずみのピアノ
Japanese, Taisho era, 1912
Artist Unknown, Japanese
Publisher: Naniwaya
Printed by: Tokyo Design Printing Company (Tokyo zuan insatsu sha)

New Year’s Card: Seahorses
年賀状:龍の落とし子
Japanese, Early Shôwa era, 1928
Takahashi Haruka, Japanese, dates unknown
Publisher: Yamaguchi Seikyokudô

{ All images above borrowed from the MFA’s online New Year’s Japanese Postcard collection,
which you should visit HERE. }

Aren’t they great? Yeah, I thought so, too. Japan’s pretty awesome.

I really need to get back to that museum.


(Initial “I” found HERE)

Throwback Thursday: 1920s Illustrations of John Held, Jr.

Few artists define an age as thoroughly as John Held, Jr., defines the “Roaring Twenties.” Born in 1889, he was the right age at the right time with an outlook and sense of humor that shaped as well as recorded a generation. (Source)

Held’s talents bloomed early. In fact, he sold his first illustration to highly reputable Life Magazine at the tender age of 15. What ultimately followed was an illustrious career depicting the flappers and the jazz age of the 1920s (and, occasionally, some cringeworthy commentaries on women).

For additional biographical information on John Held, Jr., click here.

The following images are all borrowed either from Art Deco’s fabulous blog, or from this Flickr set devoted to Held’s works…

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French Friday: Le blog de la méchante!

A “méchante” is a mean girl. Yet, Élodie seems as creatively (and fashionably) charming as they come. I was introduced to her site by the lovely Katrina over at Pugly Feet, where she featured Elodie as one of her style muses back in June. Trust me: you are going to want to steal ALL of Elodie’s outfits. It’s kind of annoying how adorable she is, really. Maybe that‘s why she’s la méchante.

All images below have been graciously borrowed from Le blog de la méchante:

passage-moliere

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librairie-dedale

marcs

lampadaire-parisien

veste-noire

French Friday!

For this installment of French Friday, I offer you… CLIPPINGS.

1. Five o’clock tea, anyone? (oh, but don’t forget to remove the glove from your right hand)

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2. Dear Françoise… My parents want me to be a gold-digger, but I’m pretty vehemently against it. Please tell me I’m right. Thank you.

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**These images, and many many more, may be found over at the always inspiring Rétroblogpub.