Tag Archives: Germany

Vintage international hotel luggage labels.

Just learned about this fabulous collection of vintage hotel luggage labels from The Silver Lining Blog, which is quickly becoming one of my new favorite aesthetic pleasures. Great vintage design finds that make me exceedingly happy. Anyway, back to the luggage labels. The labels below come from the Rázsó Collection.

Did I mention that they’re all available for purchase? Yeah. Hold me back.

Vintage wintery labels, courtesy of Germany & Denmark

I’ve been adapting to life back in my homeland (Ohio) over the past several days, so I had to take a break from blogging, as well as from reading blogs. Which has caused me to experience some serious pangs of withdrawal: cold sweats, twitching… not pretty.

But I’m back. And I now must absolutely share with you a couple of my favorite finds over the past handful of snowy days.

First, I bestow upon you the glory of le ski, vintage German match label style, from the brilliant Agence Eureka:

Next, I offer you the Christmas seal loveliness of Denmark, discovered over at Grain Edit earlier today:

Now you know why I was basically foaming at the freakin’ mouth, itchin’ to post these little bad boys for you. 🙂

Love them.

Enjoy, and I’ll be back before any excessive twitching starts to occur.

Throwback Thursday: Notgeld, German Emergency Currency

If all money looked this pretty, I’d definitely be more apt to save it.

The images presented below represent a selection from Lliazd’s unbelievably expansive Flickr set of Notgeld, which was German emergency currency used during the post-WWI years. Lliazd’s provides us with an in-depth look into the personal, political, and aesthetic significance of these images on his Flickr page:

walter-muller-notgeld_skaliertAfter 800 years of life in the same region, my wife’s family left Germany. In 1935 Nazism had become unbearable. They were lucky enough to understand the risk it posed for Jews living in Germany and they left. Until then, her family was part of a comfortable and prosperous middle class, involved in the tobacco business in the city of Karlsruhe.

At the end of the First World War her grandfather started collecting Notgeld produced by many German and Austrian towns and companies to make front to deflation first and inflation later with the objective of providing stability to workers and residents. Notgeld (emergency currency) was issued by cities, boroughs, even private companies while there was a shortage of official coins and bills. Nobody would pay in coins while their nominal value was less than the value of the metal. And when inflation went on, the state was just unable to print bills fast enough. Some companies couldn’t pay their workers because the Reichsbank just couldn’t provide enough bills. So they started to print their own money – they even asked the Reichsbank beforehand. As long as the Notgeld was accepted, no real harm was done and it just was a certificate of debt. Often it was even a more stable currency than real money, as sometimes the denomination was a certain amount of gold, dollars, corn, meat, etc.

They made it very pretty on purpose: many people collected the bills, and the debt would never have to be paid. It was printed on all kinds of materials: leather, fabric, porcelain, silk, tin foil. (Read more HERE)

Behold, the beauty of Notgeld:

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Blickfang: German book covers

The other day, I was fortunate enough to have a FABULOUS new Twitter friend retweet the link to my post on Carl Jung’s Red Book . This new Twitter friend, @roundmyskull, just so happens to have an amazingly overstimulating blog devoted to the treasures of “forgotten literature.” There, I discovered that, in German, “blickfang” means “eye-catcher,” and it is part of the title of a fabulous collection of thousands of book cover designs from Weimar Berlin, from 1919-1933. (Click HERE for a link to the book)

All images below have been graciously borrowed from the highly seductive blog, A Journey Round My Skull. I majorly encourage you to visit the blog… and the STELLAR Flickr stream. You’ll spend HOURS…

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Berlin’s Buchstaben (Letter) Museum

Over the weekend, I was perusing my favorite typography blog (aptly called ilovetypography, or “iLT” for the cool kids) when I came across the fabulosity of type guru Rob Keller. Thanks to his aptly titled blog, called You Should Like Type Too (you really should), I am now entertaining incessant fantasies that involve variations of me fondling and slithering among the cool, slick typescapes of Berlin’s Buchstaben Museum. The Museum, established in 2005, houses an impressive collection of rescued letters that once combined to form building/store signage from Berlin and beyond.

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The above photo and those that follow are courtesy of the Buchstaben Museum’s website. You’re welcome:

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Please please please check out You Should Like Type Too for more beautiful photos of the Museum and other brilliant and drool-worthy typographic finds.

The next set of photos was also taken at the Buchstaben Museum, but I’ve graciously borrowed the images from HERE:

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I could not be more in love with this museum. If I had met the Museum prior to Valentine’s Day, I would have made it my Valentine (sorry, Jessica).

At least now I know where I want to go whenever I have enough money to go on another trip.

🙂