Tag Archives: illustration

From Poe to Parker.

In my course, we’re transitioning. From one fractured poet to another, we’re transitioning.

From Poe to Parker.

So, I thought I’d present you with an imagistic representation of this literary trajectory.

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On my summer reading list:

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Peter Ackroyd is somewhat of a kindred spirit, frequently publishing wonderful material on tortured poets, even novels (Ackroyd’s Chatterton, for example, which I strongly recommend to anyone even remotely interested in the British Romantics).

The Taxali 300

Why don’t I live in Toronto? Or, at least, only an hour away or something? Because in Toronto there’s a place called Narwhal Art Projects. And at Narwhal Art Projects there’s an exhibition called The Taxali 300. And the Taxali 300 runs for a month, from January 28 – February 28, and it features hundreds (umm, 300?) of Taxali’s amazing illustrations and collages, together in a collection for the first time. From Narwhal’s website:

The Taxali 300 showcases hundreds of small illustrations and collages originally created for such esteemed publica- tions as Rolling Stone, Newsweek, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeneys among others. Spanning two decades and multiple awards and accolades, The Taxali 300 presents Gary’s exceptional collection of commercial illustration as a complete body of work in a gallery setting for the first time, allowing viewers to appreciate the prolific scope of visual communications and tactile character design intrinsically associated with Gary Taxali’s artwork.

It was painfully difficult to select only a handful to share with you here, so I really hope you’ll go to Narwhal’s gallery and look through them all yourselves. But here are some of my favorites. Emphasis on “some” – I have about a bajillion.


OK, I need to stop. I could post them all. Seriously.

Hope you like.

The Cornell Widow

was just gazing at some of the tons of brilliantly beautiful ephemera images over at Ephemera Assemblyman, and I thought I’d post some covers of a Cornellian student-run magazine called The Widow. It enjoyed over six decades of publication (1894-1962) until it was forced to go out of print because of yucky financial problems (ain’t that always the case?). As the Ephemera Assemblyman quotes on his site, The Widow’s name derives from “the college widow,” which was the name co-eds used to ascribe to “the girl who bowled over class after class of freshmen without really landing one.” Lovely. As you might imagine, the contents and images of the magazine could occasionally trend toward the misogynistic. But oh how the designs were lovely. Take a peek…

(All images below courtesy of the Ephemera Assemblyman)

That last cover was for an issue that appeared in 1981 (yes, 19 years after The Widow had actually folded) and was meant to mock the 100-year anthology of The Widow‘s rival, The Cornell Daily Sun).

For more covers as well as some interior content, head over to the Ephemera Assemblyman HERE.

(Initial “I” from HERE)

Lehel Kovács’s Google Street View series

Lehel Kovács is a Hungary-based freelance illustrator, and his recent Google Street View series of sketches is deservedly catching lots of internet attention lately. Some of my favorites appear below, but I strongly encourage you all to visit his website, Flickr stream, and blog for more (and I am so grateful for just how much more there is!):

Which? magazine covers

Delicious Industries proves fruitful once again, this time with their extremely fabulous collection of Which? magazine covers from the 1960s and ’70s, designed by Colin Banks and John Miles. Below are some of my favorites:

Follow Delicious Industries on Twitter HERE.

Faber & Faber book cover designs

Lovely book cover designs from Faber Books’ Photostream:

Iranian children’s books from the 1970s

Unbelievably beautiful children’s books were produced in Iran in the 1970s. I just wish that I could read them.

The images below are courtesy of A Journey Round My Skull’s “Iran” collection, which I strongly encourage you to visit. Such great use of color, brilliant illustrations, and gorgeous calligraphy… I’m kind of drooling right now. In fact, I should probably go fetch a hankie.

OK. All better. Anyway, please enjoy, and please also take a moment to visit the International Children’s Digital Library HERE.

All images below kindly borrowed from A Journey Round My Skull, a stellar blog of under-appreciated (old) books that you should visit at any and all times.

The birdies might be my favorite, despite the lack of calligraphy/text.

Follow A Journey Round My Skull on Twitter HERE and visit the blog HERE.