Tag Archives: love

V is for Vintage. And for Valentines.

For the past few days, I’ve been having fun taking pictures of some vintage papery items and ephemera that I’ve collected over the past several months, preparing some new listings for my Etsy shop. I’ve already sold a couple of these, which is amazing (first sales of 2010!), but I must admit that I’m a little sad to see some of these vintage cards go. Separation anxiety increases exponentially with vintage items, doesn’t it? One-of-a-kind, never to return again… I don’t even want to think of what I’ll be like when I have children that will eventually leave home. Hopefully they’ll return at some point, though. ANYWAY. Back to my new items. Here are some images for you, to show you why it’s so d@mn hard for me to let go.

{ Vintage Postcard Sets }

1. Five vintage large-letter linen city/state postcards from the 1940s and 50s { Etsy Listing HERE } :

2. Three Vintage Valentines from the 1920s-1940s { SOLD OUT } :

{ Valentine’s Day / Love-Themed Stuff }

1. Four Valentine’s To Do List Cards { Etsy Listing HERE } :
These aren’t vintage, but they are V for Valentines. 🙂 I’ve hand-stamped each card in red block letters;
just check them off once you’ve completed each task!
Red envelopes and some super top-secret prizes included.

2. Paper Pack ‘O Love { Etsy Listing HERE } :
As you will see on both my Etsy page and my Facebook page, I am admittedly not a big fan of Valentine’s Day.
That being said, I am a GINORMOUS fan of ephemera and vintage & modern papers and random doo-dads.
(Yes, even if they have hearts or references to Cupid and February 14th. 🙂
So, with that in mind, I couldn’t help but contribute some of the red/heart/love-themed items to a pack of their own.
I’m guessing there are about 40 pieces or so. And they’re awesome.

{ More Coming Soon… }

More vintage postcard sets { New Year’s and other holidays; humour cards; advertisements; nature; mixed },

Vintage international stamp packs { color-themed; location-themed; mixed },

Antique button sets { color-themed; mixed },

Small mixed ephemera packs.

Thank you for looking, and stay tuned!

Missed Connections, illustrated by Sophie Blackall

sophie.RubysWishcoverI just discovered Sophie Blackall’s Missed Connections project via a Facebook posting from Chronicle Books, who recently published a children’s book, Ruby’s Wish, which Blackall illustrated. On her Missed Connections blog, Blackall provides uniquely imaginative visual translations of a selection of those addictive Craigslist postings in which someone loses contact with someone else for some reason or other. Sometimes endearing, occasionally heartbreaking, the messages Blackall transmits are always vividly touching. Plus, many include book references. 🙂

The illustrations below are all graciously borrowed from Blackall’s blog HERE, where many more great illustrative interpretations await you!

(Incidentally, many of these illustrations are also available for purchase as prints in Blackall’s very own Etsy shop HERE!)

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For more info on Sophie Blackall and her lovely illustrations, click over to her personal site HERE.

Quotes & Notes

I just discovered the exquisitely lovely Quotes & Notes via Craftgawker. The mix of printed basswood, creamy fabrics, and unique quotations (some even in French, HELLO?!?) make me kind of swoon. And get me excited for Christmas. (Yes, I know it’s not Halloween yet, but just look at the images below! You’ll see what I mean, I swear.)

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Every item in the Quotes & Notes Etsy shop is available for customizing! Visit this lovely little shop HERE.

French Friday: 185 French Love Letters

In the summer of 2000, a handsome 36-year-old single Parisian posed (clothed) for a full-page photograph in a popular, large-circulation French woman’s magazine. Readers desiring a romantic relationship were invited to read an interview with the man and write him, care of the magazine, with details of their lives and romantic aspirations. 185 single women replied. Each letter was a manifestation, often powerful, of female desire. The bachelor, overwhelmed, decided to not meet a single woman.

Further detailed below, the letters collectively represent a striking case study of female desire and loneliness, impulsivity and creativity. And they can be yours for a paltry $12,200. All sales final.

NOT one of the 185 letters, but still awesome (Image: http://www.mayoph.com/images2/02d185.jpg)

NOT one of the 185 letters, but still awesome (Image: http://www.mayoph.com/images2/02d185.jpg)

Further excerpts from the seller’s eBay listing, where you can view several enlarged images of mixtures of letters:

185 love letters in French, sent from 185 women to a Parisian, offering an unmediated view of female desire in turn-of-the-millennium France. Ten of the letters are typed; 175 are handwritten.

In the summer of 2000, a handsome 36-year-old single Parisian posed (clothed) for a full-page photograph in a popular, large-circulation French woman’s magazine. Readers desiring a romantic relationship were invited to read an interview with the man and write him, care of the magazine, with details of their lives and romantic aspirations. 185 single women replied. Each letter was a manifestation, often powerful, of female desire. The bachelor, overwhelmed, decided to not meet a single woman.

The manuscripts are sold as a single lot. Many contain poems, drawings and photographs. Some of the sheets of paper, parchments and envelopes have been sprayed with perfume, painted with watercolors. One envelope contains a stick of still-fragrant incense. The collection includes a large selection of stamps affixed to envelopes for replies. (The buyer will receive the part of the self-addressed stamped envelope with the stamp or France’s La Poste sticker, but not the part containing the writer’s name and address.) The letters were written in France, save a dozen or so penned in Belgium, Canada, Costa Rica, Denmark, Germany, Latvia, Spain and Switzerland. The letters embody France’s strong epistolary tradition, which greatly values detailed expressions of sentiments, romantic recollections and beautiful penmanship. (Only 10 of the letters are typewritten; one is partially typed.)

The letters offer an unmediated view of fair-sex sentiments in turn-of-the-millennium France. Taken together, the collection provides insights—unfiltered by academics and sociologists—into French women’s emotional prerequisites for sex. (Careful reading is not always necessary; a large number of letters were written with disarming directness.)

Broadly speaking, the writing styles are variations of come-hither prose, at times perhaps coy. One young woman writes: “Le plus beau cadeau que j’ai pu offrir est mon corp [sic] mon âme oui m’offrir à un homme est le plus beau cadeau je crois.” (“The most beautiful gift I can give is my body, my soul, yes, I believe that giving myself to a man is the most beautiful gift.”) Another writes of her “charmant accent du Midi” (“charming Midi [southern-France] accent.”). Another explains that her favorite way to lift her spirits when feeling blue is to “faire l’amour” (“make love”). Another promises her “premier cadeau” (“first gift”): A “massage très long et très doux” (“a long and tender massage”).

The lot is sold with the agreement that no letter in its entirety may be published (electronically or otherwise). The buyer must return a signed legal agreement before the box will be shipped. Entire letters may, however, be used in art projects.
Excerpts of the letters may be used for art projects, scholarly works, press articles, poetry, scripts, screenplays, novels and non-fiction writings. Publishers or authors interested in publishing the letters (or a selection of the letters) in their entirety should contact the seller to discuss a special arrangement. The buyer is encouraged to use the letters for the teaching of French, French culture, psychoanalysis, psychology, gender studies, penmanship or other subjects. As time passes, the letters will provide an increasingly rare and poignant portrait of turn-of-the-millennium France and its women.

Interested buyers may review the letters for free and without obligation in Paris (contact the seller to discuss other possible arrangements for pre-sale review of the letters). Sales are final.

EBAY LISTING: 185 FRENCH LOVE LETTERS

Wordshop Wednesday: Storeyshop!

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My oldest sister is engaged (yay!), and I’ve been searching all over Etsy for inspired invitation/RSVP ideas. I came across Storeyshop‘s hand-cut cards and had to post some images. They’re too intricately whimsical and typographically exquisite not to highlight…

Enjoy! And please visit the Storeyshop Etsy store for more of their fantastic cards…

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Lettering Is My Valentine.

Valentine’s Day has always been, in my opinion, a false holiday. The exception being, of course, elementary school days where we all had the opportunity to decorate and individualize our own paper bag Valentine “mailboxes,” which would receive personalized Valentine letters that instantly produced smiles (especially the Snoopy ones).  Since then, though… you could say I’m not a fan.

But Valentine’s Day is primarily about the celebration of love, right? So… that’s my focus. And, this Valentine’s Day, I’ve decided to glorify my one true love: lettering. Specifically, the lettering of Ms. Jessica Hische, whom I’ve just discovered thanks to the Uppercase blog, which is another love of mine.

Each of the following images are taken from Jessica’s blog:

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French Friday!

For this installment of French Friday, I offer you… CLIPPINGS.

1. Five o’clock tea, anyone? (oh, but don’t forget to remove the glove from your right hand)

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2. Dear Françoise… My parents want me to be a gold-digger, but I’m pretty vehemently against it. Please tell me I’m right. Thank you.

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**These images, and many many more, may be found over at the always inspiring Rétroblogpub.